April 28, 2011

Russia: Cherkizovo launches US$685 million poultry project

Russia's biggest meat producer Cherkizovo said it had started building a huge poultry complex worth US$685 million (UK£411.268 million) in Yelets in the central Russian Lipetsk region. The complex will have broiler sites with 10 million poultry places, parent stock and reproduction flock sites for 900,000 heads and slaughtering and processing facilities, Cherkizovo said in a statement.

Large feed mill

It will also include facilities to produce 512,000 tonnes of poultry feed per year and to store up to 50,000 tonnes of frozen products. The complex is expected to be built in 2013 and to reach full capacity by 2015. Of the total investment 80 percent were provided by Gazprombank, a former banking unit of Russian energy giant Gazprom, as a 10-year loan, Cherkizovo said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Company update: DSM Q1 2011

Life Sciences company DSM reported its Q1 results this week. EBITDA from continuing operations was up 14 percent to € 325 million (US$481.455 million). 2011 is expected to be a strong year for DSM towards achieving the 2013 targets. Life Sciences results were driven by ongoing good performance in Nutrition and Materials Sciences posted solid results reflecting volume gains and pricing strength.

Feike Sijbesma, CEO/Chairman of the DSM Managing Board, said: "Our robust performance in Q1 2011 represents further progress towards our 2013 targets as we continue to successfully execute our strategy. In the quarter we successfully completed our acquisition of Martek, welcoming its employees to DSM.

The integration of Martek started immediately and the contribution to our profit is in line with expectations. Our business outlook for the rest of the year is positive and we expect 2011 to be a strong year for DSM." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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China to limit corn use in non-animal-feed projects

In an effort to secure grain supplies for livestock farmers China is taking steps to limit the use of gain and edible oils as raw materials in non-animal-feed projects, according to China’s top economic planner, the National Development & Reform Commission (NDRC). Corn is used to make non-feed products ranging from ethanol to starch and sweeteners, which consume about one-third of China's corn output.

This consumption diverts supply from animal feed millers in the world's most populous country, raising the prospect of corn shortages, as consumption is expected to grow much faster than output. Within the new guidelines processors will be barred from buying more corn than their consumption level in 2009 and the government will increase value-added taxes on corn-based products. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Adjusting No-Till burndown programs for later planting

Wet weather and delayed planting have several effects on no-till burndown programs, especially in soybeans. First, the weeds get bigger and what is a relatively tame burndown situation in April can become pretty hairy by the first two weeks of May.

With this and the price of glyphosate in mind, the rate of glyphosate in any glyphosate-based burndown treatments should be increased, preferably to 1.5 lbs. acid equivalent (ae)/acre. Second, in the rush to plant when it finally dries out, it can be difficult to keep 2,4-D in the burndown mix and wait yet another seven days to plant soybeans. Here’s a review of soybean burndown options for this situation. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Wheat tumbles on improved weather - Grain and Soy Review

US wheat futures tumbled Wednesday on a combination of investors reducing risk exposure in the market and weather conditions that should ease stress to crops in the US and Europe. Wheat for July delivery ended down 35 cents, or 4.1 percent, at US$8.12 (UK£4.875) a bushel at Chicago Board Of Trade. At the Kansas City Board of Trade, hard red winter wheat for July delivery lost 3.9 percent to US$9.23 (UK£5.542)  a bushel. Hard red spring wheat for July delivery closed down 2.8 percent at US$9.54 (UK£5.728) 1/4 a bushel at the MGEX in Minneapolis.

Broad based selling was consistent across the grain complex at CBOT, reflective of investors reducing risk in the absence of a fundamental change in the market, said Shawn McCambridge, grains analyst with Prudential Bache in Chicago. Traders reduced risk after recent gains, worried Federal Reserve's rate decision and Fed Chairman Ben Bernanke's history making news conference might sway the US dollar or other markets that influence commodities, McCambridge said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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Valuable animal proteins are safe for feed use

Draft legislation published by the European Commission confirms the safety, feed value and environmental importance of processed animal protein, according to EFPRA, the body which represents European animal by-product processors.

“We are pleased that after thorough examination of safety and value of processed animal protein, the EU Commission has moved to amend the regulations,” says Niels Leth Nielsen, EFPRA President. “Assuming that the new legislation is approved by member states later this year which we hope it will b this valuable feed ingredient could be back in selected rations within a year.

“The legislation will restrict the use of processed animal proteins to feed for omnivores and carnivores including pigs, poultry and farmed fish. The ban on feeding animal proteins to ruminants remains in place. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Australian farmers fight sale of AWB to Cargill

The New South Wales Farmers Assocation (NSWFA) is continuing its fight to stop the sale of AWB to US agribusiiness Cargill, telling Canberra that the move is against national interest and threatens the viability of family farming in Australia.

The NSWFA grains committee objected to the AUS$1.2 billion (€0.883 billion) sale following its announcement last December. NSWFA wants to maintain Australian ownership of AWB and convert it into a co-operative structure similar to CBH in WA.

They are looking for government assistance to help purchase the AWB commodity trading business, estimating its value at about AUS$850 million (€625.365 million) but don’t want government legislation re-introduced, to make grain acquisition compulsory, citing a distinct “lack of political will” in that area. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Press Release: Merger of ESM (UK) Ltd and Satake Europe Ltd












The name of ESM (UK) Ltd is now redundant and the newly combined businesses will trade under the name of Satake Europe Ltd. Satake Europe Ltd is a division of Satake USA Inc, a wholly owned subsidiary of the Satake Corporation, Japan.

We are pleased to announce this merger to all our customers in Europe, Africa and the Middle East as it will facilitate greater efficiencies within our business and as such will allow us to reflect such benefits when dealing with your requirements.

Should you have any questions or require further clarification, please contact a member of the Satake management team or refer to our website www.satake-europe.com

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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April 27, 2011

More groups involved in GIPSA rule proposal

The American Angus Association and Certified Angus Beef LLC have joined the discussion on United States Department of Agriculture's proposed Grain Inspection Packers & Stockyards Administration Rules. Both groups want to see certain "word changes" in the proposed rules. In a letter sent to Ag Secretary Tom Vilsack, Certified Angus Beef President John Stika wrote that unless heavily edited, they believe the proposed rule will cause cattlemen and brand partners great economic hardships as their investment in premium genetics meet a constricted market.

The USDA agency last summer unveiled its proposed rule changes that govern livestock marketing. A divide soon appeared within the beef industry over lengthening the comment period, and whether the proposed changes themselves needed changes. "Fairness" debates began from coffee shops to editorials and letters to USDA expressing either support or concern over vague language. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers


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Changes abound in pesticide application industry

A growing trend in US agriculture is more farmers and ranchers are purchasing equipment to apply pesticides versus hiring custom applicators. Many producers have either never sprayed or it has been a long time since the last application. Meanwhile, the pesticide application industry has changed dramatically.

A major emphasis in pesticide application education and training is underway to assist these applicators in the safe and efficient use of current pest control equipment. Robert Wolf shared a plethora of knowledge on this subject during the Southwest Ag Summit in Yuma, Ariz., in March. Wolf recently retired as professor and application technology specialist with Kansas State University (KSU) and now operates Wolf Consulting & Research LLC in Mahomet, Ill. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers


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USDA rule encourages purchase of local agricultural products for nutrition programs

Agriculture Under Secretary Kevin Concannon announced that United States Department of Agriculture's child nutrition programs are implementing new rules designed to encourage use of local farm products in school meals. The final rule, published in the Federal Register, will let schools and other providers give preference to unprocessed locally grown and locally raised agricultural products as they purchase food for the National School Lunch, School Breakfast, Special Milk, Child and Adult Care, Fresh Fruit and Vegetable, and Summer Food Service programs.

The rule is part of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 signed into law by President Obama and one of the key provisions to bolster farm to school programs across the country. "This rule is an important milestone that will help ensure that our children have access to fresh produce and other agricultural products," said Agriculture Under Secretary Kevin Concannon. "It will also give a much-needed boost to local farmers and agricultural producers."  Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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Organic farming grows to US$29-billion industry

The organic industry grew at a rate of nearly eight percent in 2010, bucking the current trend whereby "flat is the new growth" for many other segments of the economy. Further, some sectors of the organic market enjoyed annual growth of well over 30 percent, the Organic Trade Association (OTA) revealed in releasing findings from its 2011 Organic Industry Survey. In 2010, the organic industry grew to over US$28.6 billion (UK£17.263 billion).

"While total US food sales grew by less than one percent in 2010, the organic food industry grew by 7.7 percent," said Christine Bushway, OTA's CEO and Executive Director. "Consumers continue to vote with their dollars in favour of the organic choice. These results illustrate the positive contribution organic agriculture and trade make to our economy, and particularly to rural livelihoods," Bushway said. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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Kiotechagil launches new enzyme range

Kiotechagil, the international supplier of high performance natural feed additives, has launched Feedzyme, a new feed additive enzyme range that covers nearly all feeding situations. “Our Feedzyme enzymes offer a unique, environmentally friendly means of improving the digestion of feed, resulting in healthier animals with improved feed conversion, reduced feed costs and improved litter or dung quality,” said Kiotechagil’s Mike Rogers.

The benefits of using enzymes as feed additives include boosting enzyme activity in the immature gut of young animals.  By supplementing existing digestive enzymes the Feedzyme range promotes more complete digestion enabling the incorporation of less digestible feed raw materials, often of cereal origin.  This permits the use of raw materials like DDGS in low energy diets, without compromising overall performance. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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AVMA to collaborate with FDA on antimicrobial use

The American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) has created a committee specifically to provide input to the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on policies and regulations governing veterinarians' involvement in the use of antimicrobials in food animals. The new Steering Committee for FDA Policy on Veterinary Oversight of Antimicrobials includes five members who will be charged with working with the FDA Center for Veterinary Medicine to help develop practical means to increase veterinary oversight of antimicrobial use.

"Antimicrobial resistance and the debate on their judicious use is an important issue facing veterinary medicine today.  This committee was assembled to help the FDA examine both the need for increased veterinary oversight in order to minimise any potential increase in human antibiotic resistance while still ensuring that these important medicines continue to remain available to veterinarians when needed," said Dr. John Brooks, chair of the AVMA Executive Board.  "Each of these members was selected for their understanding of this delicate balance and for their ability to tackle tough issues objectively with the public well-being in mind." Read more ...
 
This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Phytogenic feed additive gets positive response for use in weaned piglets

The phytogenic feed additive Fresta F, produced and marketed by Delacon, has received a positive scientific opinion by the European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) on the safety and efficacy in use for weaned piglets. The feed additive is a preparation of partially micro-encapsulated essential oils from caraway and lemon, dried spices and dried herbs.

Scientific opinion

Following a request from the European Commission, the Panel on Additives and Products or Substances used in Animal Feed (Feedap) was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on the safety for the target animal(s), consumer, user and the environment and the efficacy of the product for weaned piglets at a recommended dose range of 250-400 mg/kg complete feeding stuff. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Australian scientists work to produce omega-3 from canola

Three Australian organisations have joined together to produce specialty omega-3 oils from canola varieties, breaking the world’s reliance on fish stocks. Oilseed company Nuseed, the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) and the Grains Research and Development Corporation have joined together in an AUS$50 million (UK£32.866 million) research collaboration which will use leading edge gene technology to develop and commercialise vegetable oil which will contain the same high quality, DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) rich long chain omega-3 that traditionally comes from fish.

The goal is to take research to the commercial stage, producing healthy, long-chain omega-3 oils for the human food market but, more particularly for the lucrative aquaculture industry. The research partners were looking at ways to incorporate omega-3 enriched canola oil into fish feed. CSIRO Food Future Flagship director Bruce Lee said the organisation had been working on the project since the early 1990s. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers


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Spectacular innovations at Victam in Cologne

It is less than a week before the Victam International, Fiaap and Grapas exhibitions start at the Koeln Messe in Cologne, Germany. The new venue and spectacular innovations by leading companies promise a very interesting exhibition, setting the standard for global feed and flour milling.

More than 20 companies from all over the world have entered the Victam/AllAboutFeed innovation contest for this year’s much appreciated Innovation Award. Three international and independent judges had a hard time in picking the best innovation. The Awards will be presented on May 3, at the end of the first day of the exhibition on the Victam stand at 18.00 hrs. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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April 26, 2011

Significant changes to the farm bill are likely in 2012

“Changes in the 2012 Farm Bill appear both likely and may be significant, if not radical,” says Jon Scholl, president of American Farmland Trust (AFT). “Our country’s economic situation will be the most significant driver and agent of change in the 2012 Farm Bill.”

The Wall Street Journal reports that Standard & Poor’s has just lowered its outlook on the government’s debt level to negative the first time for such a rating. The article also notes the federal government is just weeks shy of hitting its US$14.2 trillion (€ 9.719 trillion ) debt ceiling authorized by Congress. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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Understanding how crops deal with stress - yield's biggest enemy

Like people, plants experience stress, and also, like people, the response to that stress can determine success. People can exercise, or rest, or talk about the problem. For plants, ways to deal with stress are internal. And ISU researchers are trying to understand how they do it.

Stephen Howell is a professor of genetics, development and cell biology and former director of the Plant Sciences Institute at ISU. His research is featured in the current issue of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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Provimi further invests in Poland

Provimi one of the leading feed manufacturers in Poland recently introduced a new marketing strategy and implemented an innovative investment process in the largest factory in Poland. The investments are part of the development plan for its Polish label, for which the company will allocate 50 million zloty (€12.66 million) (US$18.517 million).

Since the beginning of 2011 Provimi has been working on transforming the existing organization of regional sales into one that is focused on animal species, divided into three groups: cattle, pigs and poultry. This division is mainly to increase the effectiveness and operational efficiency of the company. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Research: China feed amino acid industry report 2010

In the feed industry, amino acid is an important nutritional additive whose main role is to compensate for the lack of amino acids in feed, thus saving a lot of high-quality protein feed such as bean cake (dregs) and fish meal, and lowering feed costs. Although the types and proportions of amino acids added are closely related to the feed sources and animal species, in the practical application of feed amino acids, methionine and lysine can occupy up to 80-90 percent, and other amino acids hold about 10-20 percent.

In China, chickens and pigs hold the largest proportion of livestock feeding. According to animal nutrition, methionine is the primary limiting amino acid for chickens, while lysine is the primary limiting amino acid for pigs. In addition, restricted by China’s level of livestock feeding economy and self-sufficiency of feed amino acids, it has become increasingly apparent that China’s feed amino acid consumption structure is dominated by methionine and lysine, and supplemented by threonine and tryptophan. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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AFIA submits comments to FDA on unapproved animal drugs

The American Feed Industry Association (AFIA) strongly encouraged Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to continue regulating veterinary medical food as “foods” in recent comments submitted to FDA. AFIA members manufacture and market a range of animal feed products that are commonly referred to by both industry and FDA as “veterinary medical foods.”

These products are formulated from recognised either as a food additive or generally recognised as safe (GRAS) animal feed ingredients to help manage from a dietary and nutritional approach, a specific disease or condition under a veterinarian’s supervision.

“These products have a long history of safe use and do not present any known animal health concerns,” according to AFIA vice president Richard Sellers. “For these reasons, AFIA believes that it is most appropriate for FDA to continue to regulate veterinary medical foods as "foods." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers


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Kansas State University’s set date for Advanced Feed Manufacturing Short Course

Kansas State University announced the upcoming Advanced Feed Manufacturing Short Course to be held on June 13 – 16 in Manhattan, Kansas. This is an interactive course that provides participants with an in-depth understanding of the specifics of feed processing. It targets individuals with feed industry experience that understand the basic principles of feed manufacturing. The fundamental processes will also be reviewed.

“Participants that attend the short course will be provided the information to hone their leadership skills and receive valuable information to improve the operations at their facility,” explained Keith Epperson, AFIA vice president of manufacturing and training. “From improving maintenance, enhancing their quality program and improving the bottom line the course will provide detailed information in many areas.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers


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Orffa successfully introduces Excentials in India

Established in 2010, Orffa’s Indian subsidiary Orffa Animal Nutrition, organised a seminar tour in the Indian market. The aim was to supply customers with solid scientific data on heat stress management and at the same time to introduce the Excential product range.

The first seminar took place in The Residency Hotel in Coimbatore on Tuesday March 22, Sri Amman Enterprises, distributor for Excentials product range in the Southern provinces (Tamilnadu and Kerala states) co-organised the seminar. With a total of 50 participants attending around  90 percent of the regions’ poultry industry was covered. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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China helps set up first feed mill in Fiji

The Fijian government on Thursday commended China for helping establish the first feed mill in the island nation. Lt. Colonel Mason Smith, permanent secretary of Fiji's Ministry of Agriculture, told media that engineers from China are in Fiji to set up the country's first feed mill at the Koronivia Research Station, as a response to the plight of livestock farmers.

According to the official, it will take Chinese engineers two weeks to set up the mill and another two weeks to train officials of his ministry to operate it. The feed mill would be commissioned in the third quarter of the year. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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April 21, 2011

Research grant for efficient beef growing project

Animal scientists from several universities, including the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, will collaborate on research aimed to improve beef cattle feed efficiency. More than 970,000 farms in the United States raise beef cattle, with a US$71 billion (€48.732 billion) retail value. However, farmers and feedlot operators spend millions of dollars every year feeding some cattle that don't grow efficiently.

"Currently, we have no highly effective tools to improve feed efficiency, which can lead to an decrease in greenhouse gas emissions and demand for additional land to produce feed," said Jerry Taylor, Wurdack Chair in animal genomics in the University of Missouri College of Agriculture, Food and Natural Resources, and project director of a US$5 million (€3.432 million) grant to study feed efficiency in cattle. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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Antibiotic misuse in China underestimated

Antibiotics added to the feed of livestock to increase productivity are not just limited to clenbuterol, and authorities are largely blind to such adulteration, according to an industry insider. A scandal uncovered last month involved pork produced by Shuanghui Group, China's largest meat producer, which was tainted with clenbuterol, which had been added to pig feed.

"In 2006, of 210,000 tons of antibiotics produced in China, 97,000 tons were directly used in livestock feed," said professor Xiao Yonghong, head of the National Antimicrobial Resistant Investigation Net under the Ministry of Health. Xiao said that the misuse of antibiotics can be disastrously detrimental to a wide range of people. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Grapas conference at Victam cancelled

The Grapas Conference, scheduled to take place May 5, 2011 at Victam International treade show in Cologne, Germany has been cancelled. The organisers stress that the GRAPAS trade show, Victam, Fiaap and all related conferences and events will still take place as scheduled. Meanwhile, the deadline for registration at the feed conferences taking place during Victam 2011, Aquafeed Horizons and the Fiaap Conference, has been extended to April 25th.

After this date, registration will be accepted on-site on a space-available basis only; discounts for groups, exhibitors and returning delegates will not apply. The feed conferences at Victam 2011 offer feed industry professionals access to a high level of expertise from leading edge applied science researchers, regulatory bodies and industry specialists: Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Direct fed microbial to lower feed costs

With corn feed prices continuing to rise, direct fed microbials or probiotics offer economic and health benefits. New study results reveal feed cost saving of one to five percent when Ganpro direct fed microbial (DFM) is added. As feed prices top US$7 per bushel, direct fed microbials (DFMs) provide poultry, swine, dairy and cattle producers a much needed option for lowering feed expenses while increasing feed efficiency and livestock weight gain.

Manufactured by Ganeden Biotech, a US-based probiotic manufacturers, Ganpro is all-natural, appropriate for livestock of all ages and is easy to implement across a wide range of diets and feeding situations. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Australian GM label call criticised

A senate hearing in Australia has been told that opposition to genetically modified (GM) crops is being driven by “a non-scientific, fact-free, alarmist and scaremongering” minority in the community. The Senate Community Affairs Committee is investigating proposed legislative amendments that would compel food producers, manufacturers and distributors to label food for presence of GM materials.

But Food Standards Australia New Zealand (FSANZ) chief executive, Steve McCutcheon, said the legislation was looking to establish a labelling standard inconsistent with existing arrangements and for a purpose unrelated to food safety. FSANZ did not approve food items, including GM foods, that were unsafe, and it was already mandatory for GM food labelling so shoppers could make informed choices. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Perstorp opens new plant in India

Feed additive producer Perstorp has opened a feed additive production plant in Vapi, India. Opening a production location in Asia is part of Perstorp’s plan to increase its presence on the Asian feed additives market. Marc Kinjet has been appointed as Business Development Manager Asia to oversee continued growth. Perstorp has long been looking for the right opportunity to strengthen its position in the growing Asian market where they see a fast growing demand for its feed additives.

As a result of the strategic direction it was decided at the beginning of 2010 to use the existing infrastructure and invest at Perstorp’s production site in Vapi, India. The facility has now been optimized to produce high quality feed additives. The main focus of the plant is the production of preservatives, which includes mould inhibitors, anti-oxidants and acidifiers. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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China secures corn for animal feeds

China, the world's second-largest corn consumer, will limit corn consumption in non-feed sectors to ensure supply for animal feed mills and to help control prices, corn traders and local media reports said. Beijing has asked banks to halt loans to companies, excluding state stockpiling agencies that would have used the funds to buy corn for non-feed processing purposes, local media reported.

The government has released millions of tonnes of corn from stockpiles to reduce supply pressures, but China's corn prices have still risen about 17 percent since the start of October, when food inflation started to gain significant momentum. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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High crop prices seen increasing Canadian acreage analysts

Canadian farmers are looking at the 2011 growing season as an opportunity to take advantage of historically high crop prices, and planted acreage should see an increase, according to trade estimates ahead of the Statistics Canada planting-intentions report on April 26. There is almost certainly going to be an increase in seeded acreage this spring, said Ron Frost of Frost Consulting in Calgary.

"The incentive is there for acreages to be maximised to what's available. When you combine the price incentive with the solid moisture conditions across the Canadian prairies, there will likely be one of our lower summer fallow numbers," Frost said. "That's assuming the weather cooperates throughout the month of May." Jerry Klassen, manager of GAP Grains in Winnipeg, agreed there would be more acres planted this year, and said canola would see a sizable increase from the 16.82 million acres planted in 2010. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Widespread planting anticipated for Genuity Roundup Ready Alfalfa

Strong demand for Genuity Roundup Ready Alfalfa is being reported this season now that farmers can grow the technology for the first time since 2007. “We are seeing a lot of excitement and pent-up demand for Genuity Roundup Ready Alfalfa this year, following a recent US Department of Agriculture ruling that authorised the resumption of sale and planting of the technology,” said Steve Havera, Monsanto Traits Marketing Manager in St. Louis.

“Growers recognise that this technology can allow them to increase yield potential of alfalfa that is higher in quality due to the unsurpassed weed control achievable for the life of their alfalfa stands,” he added. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Agriculture: Growing threat of wheat rust epidemics worldwide

Researchers meeting at a scientific conference in Aleppo this week reported that aggressive new strains of wheat rust diseases called stem rust and stripe rust have decimated up to 40 percent of farmers' wheat fields in recent harvests. Areas affected are North Africa, the Middle East, Central Asia and the Caucuses, including Syria, Egypt, Yemen, Turkey, Iran, Uzbekistan, Morocco, Ethiopia, and Kenya.

"These epidemics increase the price of food and pose a real threat to rural livelihoods and regional food security," said Mahmoud Solh, Director General of the International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas (ICARDA). Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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April 20, 2011

Weather extremes hang over planting season

April is a month when you can really see some weather extremes, but what we saw yesterday was simply incredible. We set record low maximum temperatures yesterday in southeastern Iowa as places there did not see readings get out of the 30s and low 40s. However, as close by as St. Louis we were scoring record HIGHS yesterday as the high temperature there got to an incredible 88 degrees.

In other words, we had high temperatures differences yesterday of nearly 50 degrees over the span of only about 200 miles! It was this extreme temperature contrast that set off yet another major severe weather outbreak the past 24 hours in the southern/eastern Corn Belt through the northern Delta, with lots of reports of tornadoes, high winds, and large hail. Probably most notable about that severe weather was reports of winds in excess of 100 miles per hour at locations in both Illinois and Ohio. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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USDA seeks farmers market information for directory

The US Department of Agriculture's Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) is opening the updating process for the USDA National Farmers Market Directory, the official count of the nation's farmers markets. For the first time this year, the directory will also track farmers markets with multiple locations and operating days.

"The USDA National Farmers Market Directory not only counts, lists and maps the country's more than 6,100 farmers markets, it is also a fantastic resource for those interested in local food production, small producer success, and public policy about regional food systems," said Agriculture Secretary Tom Vilsack.

"In addition to helping people find the closest farmers market, the farmers markets listed in this directory are included in maps, mobile apps and other stats. We hope that all managers ensure their markets are included so that no farmers market misses out on this opportunity." Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Block says S&P warning adds urgency

Former Ag Secretary John Block says with ratings agency Standard and Poor's lowering its outlook on US debt farmers and others face a grim economic landscape without swift action by Washington. Block says the US must cut spending and raise some taxes or face the loss of its triple-A bond rating that allows the government to borrow money so cheaply.

Standard and Poor's warned that the US could lose its coveted status as the world's most secure economy if lawmakers don't rein in the nation's nearly US$14.3 trillion debt (UK£8.725 trillion).  S&P changed its US debt outlook from stable to negative. Block says that adds new urgency to the debate over whether to allow continued borrowing by the Treasury. Read more ...

 This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Iowa farms host EPA administrator

US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack invited EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson to Iowa "to help her understand and appreciate what we are doing in agriculture. I think it's important for administrator Jackson to actually be on a farm and see what is taking place."

He noted the visits to livestock and crop farms and the biodiesel plant gave Jackson an "opportunity to talk to farmers and to set the record straight on a number of issues from dust, to spilled milk to cow taxes. At the same time it's an opportunity for her to learn what American farmers are doing in terms of concentration and the absolute commitment that farmers have to conservation."

Gordon Wassenaar, a Prairie City, Iowa, row crop producer, left, explained to Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack and EPA Administrator Lisa Jackson how he uses hi-tech equipment such as auto steering. Read more ...

 This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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2011 agriculture land trends publication available from ASFMRA

The California Chapter, American Society of Farm Managers & Rural Appraisers (ASFMRA), has released the 2011 issue of Trends in Agricultural Land & Lease Values, a comprehensive guide to rural land values and trends in California and Nevada.

This year’s issue, available in both print and electronic formats, includes current and historical rural land and lease value data, land trends information, and feature articles covering walnuts and investing in farmland. The annual publication is the number one source for agricultural land value data covering the two states and serves as a premiere resource tool for agribusiness.

Sam Bettencourt, president & CEO of Stanislaus Farm Supply in Modesto, had this to say about Trends, “The Trends publication has become an important resource that we count on each year to help us determine the prevailing course of our industry. Certainly a quality took that our Board and staff find to be not only informative, but a great read!” Read more ...

 This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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Hybrid rice spells crop disaster in Noakhali

Farmers in Bangladesh who planted imported Chinese hybrid rice seeds are suffering massive crop losses. Meanwhile, China's leading hybrid rice seed company, Yuan Longping Hightech Agriculture is pursuing investments in Zambia and Brazil.

Thousands of farmers are struggling to stomach a massive crop loss of hybrid rice 'Jhalak' in Noakhali district.The district's Department of Agriculture Extension (DAE) said Jhalak was cultivated on 1,665 hectares of land, of which crops of 465 hectares were entirely ruined and that of the rest partially.

DAE officials and importer of Chinese-origin Jhalak paddy seed, Energypac Agro Ltd, blamed fluctuating temperature and blast disease for the debacle.  The officials said the district's Boro rice production target would fall short by at least 2000 tonnes this season due to the setback.  A visit to the area last week revealed that flower-spikes of most of the plants in the field have dried or are drying before the paddy ripened. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers

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April 19, 2011

Continuous corn disease considerations

When corn is planted back into corn residue, producers should be aware of the increased potential for certain diseases, says Doug Jardine, Kansas State Research and Extension plant pathologist. Not all diseases are affected by crop rotation, however.

The following is a brief summary from Jardine of how soil and leaf diseases differ between continuous corn and rotated corn.
  • With continuous corn, there is a greater probability of developing lesion nematode problems. 
  • Root rots, such as Fusarium root rot, could potentially be more severe. Root rot often develops into stalk rot. 
  • Root rots also are weather dependent, so just being in continuous corn does not necessarily lead to more root rot every year. 
  • Gray leaf spot could be more of a concern, since the disease overwinters on corn residue. Read more ...
This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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USDA and DOE announce biomass funding

To support President Obama's goal of reducing America's oil imports by one-third by 2025, the US Departments of Agriculture (USDA) and Energy (DOE) today jointly announced up to US$30 million (UK£ 18.451 million) over three to four years that will support research and development in advanced biofuels, bioenergy and high-value biobased products.

The projects funded through the Biomass Research and Development Initiative (BRDI) will help create a diverse group of economically and environmentally sustainable sources of renewable biomass and increase the availability of alternative renewable fuels and biobased products. Advanced biofuels produced from these projects are expected to reduce greenhouse gas emissions by a minimum of 50 percent compared to fossil fuels and will play an important role in diversifying America's energy portfolio. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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15.4 million farmers can’t be wrong about GM crops

Do Genetically Modified (GM) crops have socio-economic benefits? 15.4 million farmers around the world who planted these crops on 148 million hectares (365 million acres) in 2010 would most likely answer with a resounding ‘yes,’ thanks to higher profits from higher yields and environmental benefits that also translate into savings. In response to a European Commission report, EuropaBio notes that a new study also launched this week on GM crops' global socio-economic and environmental impacts shows their positive impacts worldwide.

The European Commission report on GM crops’ socio-economic implications should encourage European policymakers to reflect on this important topic and the social and economic benefits Europe is missing out on by not approving more GM crops for cultivation. The European Commission report recognises that farmers cultivating GM crops “could benefit from higher yields.” Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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Crops top energy among investors

Agricultural commodities have proved significantly more popular than energy among buyers of exchange-traded products, despite the high-profile threats to oil supplies and Japan's nuclear reactor crisis. Exchange-traded commodities and funds saw inflows of more than US$600 million (UK£369.026  million) in March, the fifth successive monthly increase, analysis by Societe Generale showed.

However, investors pared exposure to exchange-traded energy products by more than US$500 million (UK£307.522 million), despite the month bringing continued tensions in the Middle East and North Africa, which bought New York oil prices to a two-year high during the month. Read more ...

This blog is written by Martin Little The Global Miller, published and supported by the GFMT Magazine and International Milling Directory from Perendale Publishers
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