February 22, 2017

Alapala company profile



Establishing plants at any desired capacity, Alapala Machine is a company that exports 95 percent of its current production today and has hundreds of references in over 75 countries in 4 continents including developed industrial countries such as Belgium, France, Italy, Canada and USA. Alapala continually develops and expands thanks to its superior technology infrastructure, perfectionist staff and management, and its quality and customer-oriented approach.

It renders the best before-sales and after-sales services with its staff specialized in their industry, overseas representatives, strong service networks and spare-part stocks.

Alapala can manufacture quality and high performance machinery where the best efficiency ad products can be obtained in the production facilities that have the most developed and state-of-the art technology.
Alapala’s lines of business:

•    Wheat flour mills,
•    Semolina mills,
•    Corn flour mills,
•    Rice processing plants,
•    Feed mills,
•    Cereal storage systems,
•    Weighing, conveying, packing equipment
•    Harbour facilities under the licence of Tramco Inc-USA

 

Read more HERE.


 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

23/02/2017: Hansen-Mueller announces New Fremont, Nebraska facility

Hansen-Mueller Co., a grain industry leader based in Omaha, Neb., announced today that they will locate a state-of-the-art bagging facility in Fremont, Neb. for animal and pet food products

“We are happy to bring an expansion of our current operations to Fremont and become a part of this business community. We located an existing building that met our needs and were able to acquire that facility.” said Jack Hansen, founder and president of Hansen-Mueller Co.

   
Image: Ian Sane
Mayor Scott Getzschman of Fremont echoed Mr Hansen’s sentiments, “This project is a great win for Fremont. The operations fit into our animal food manufacturing target industry, which speaks to why our community is a great fit for Hansen-Mueller Co.”

“It was a pleasure working with the Hansen-Mueller Co. team and supporting them as they explored Fremont,” said Cecilia Harry, executive director of the Greater Fremont Development Council.

“They will be a great addition to our animal food manufacturing footprint and our greater business community.”

The first phase of the project will initially create five – 10 jobs with a multi-million dollar investment.

The firm purchased a 60,000 square foot facility on South Union St. in Fremont.

The operations will include state-of-the-art conventional and organic bagging lines for animal and pet foods packaged under a number of well-known brand names, several private label companies and Hansen-Mueller’s own branded products.

The lines are designed to ensure that the integrity of the organic lines remains intact, which will deliver premium organic products to customers.

Hansen-Mueller Co. believes there is tremendous potential for the project to grow in the future.

They also appreciate that Fremont has made it possible for their contractors to stay in the community during the construction phase to maximise the positive impact the project will have on the community.

 Hansen-Mueller Co. is also happy to announce that long time Fremont resident, Kathy Butler, has been named as Facility Manager for the new operation.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

23/02/2017: EuroTier 2016, record breaking

A record-breaking 2,629 exhibitors and 163,000 visitors descended upon Germany’s famous Fairgrounds conference centre in Hanover from November 15-18, 2016 for what has been referred to as the world’s leading trade fair for animal production, EuroTier

Covering 240,000m2 in floor space, the four-day trade show attracted an impressive 36,000 visitors from over 100 countries outside of Germany and certainly lived up to its past success.
 

Highlighting the social, political and economic influences upon the marketplace, EuroTier’s attendees included several members of German parliament from both federal and state government, as well as high-ranking delegations from all over the world.

In fact, more visitors than ever before came from North and South America, as well as from the Middle and Far East. The EnergyDecentral exhibition ran alongside EuroTier, which has established itself as the international meeting place for the innovative energy supply industry.

Driving innovation and excellence, with this year’s theme of ‘animal health and welfare’ in mind, exhibitors presented product developments for a vast array of agricultural practices worldwide including breeding animals, feed storage and climate control and environmental technology.

Organised by the DLG (German Agricultural Society), the trade show spanned almost 30 halls, with each offering great food, great company and most importantly of all, concrete evidence of sustainable and efficient innovation.

Indeed, the interactive nature of the show once again proved to be its greatest asset with companies able to demonstrate live versions of their products in the flesh. All the stops were pulled and the companies’ efforts really couldn’t have looked any better.

To give an idea of the sheer size and scale of the show and what was being shown, the majority of halls offered their own niche within the agricultural industry, ranging from breeding/hatching technology in hall 2, to compound feed, feed components and additives in halls 18, 20, 22 and 23.

In hall 4 ‘poultry slaughtering and processing, egg grading and processing, special indoor emission control and poultry forum’, there was even an abundance of livestock present.


Read the full article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

23/02/2017: World’s future food security “in jeopardy” due to multiple challenges, report warns

Without additional efforts, the target of ending hunger by 2030 will not be met 22 February 2017, Rome - Mankind's future ability to feed itself is in jeopardy due to intensifying pressures on natural resources, mounting inequality, and the fallout from a changing climate, warns a new FAO report out today

Though very real and significant progress in reducing global hunger has been achieved over the past 30 years, "expanding food production and economic growth have often come at a heavy cost to the natural environment," says The Future of Food and Agriculture: Trends and Challenges.

"Almost one half of the forests that once covered the Earth are now gone. Groundwater sources are being depleted rapidly. Biodiversity has been deeply eroded," it notes.

 
Image: Feed My Starving Children
As a result, "planetary boundaries may well be surpassed, if current trends continue," cautions FAO Director-General José Graziano da Silva in his introduction to the report.

By 2050 humanity's ranks will likely have grown to nearly 10 billion people.

In a scenario with moderate economic growth, this population increase will push up global demand for agricultural products by 50 percent over present levels projects The Future of Food and Agriculture, intensifying pressures on already-strained natural resources.

At the same time, greater numbers of people will be eating fewer cereals and larger amounts of meat, fruits, vegetables and processed food — a result of an ongoing global dietary transition that will further add to those pressures, driving more deforestation, land degradation, and greenhouse gas emissions.

Alongside these trends, the planet's changing climate will throw up additional hurdles. "Climate change will affect every aspect of food production," the report says. These include greater variability of precipitation and increases in the frequency of droughts and floods.

To reach zero hunger, we need to step up our efforts
The core question raised by today's FAO publication is whether, looking ahead, the world's agriculture and food systems are capable of sustainably meeting the needs of a burgeoning global population.

The short answer? Yes, the planet's food systems are capable of producing enough food to do so, and in a sustainable way, but unlocking that potential — and ensuring that all of humanity benefits — will require "major transformations."

Without a push to invest in and retool food systems, far too many people will still be hungry in 2030 — the year by which the new Sustainable Development Goals (SDG) agenda has targeted the eradication of chronic food insecurity and malnutrition, the report warns.

"Without additional efforts to promote pro-poor development, reduce inequalities and protect vulnerable people, more than 600 million people would still be undernourished in 2030," it says. In fact, the current rate of progress would not even be enough to eradicate hunger by 2050.

Where will our food come from?

Given the limited scope for expanding agriculture's use of more land and water resources, the production increases needed to meet rising food demand will have to come mainly from improvements in productivity and resource-use efficiency.

However there are worrying signs that yield growth is levelling off for major crops. Since the 1990s, average increases in the yields of maize, rice, and wheat at the global level generally run just over 1 percent per annum, the report notes.

To tackle these and the other challenges outlined in the report, "business-as-usual" is not an option, The Future of Food and Agriculture argues. "Major transformations in agricultural systems, rural economies and natural resource management will be needed if we are to meet the multiple challenges before us and realise the full potential of food and agriculture to ensure a secure and healthy future for all people and the entire planet," it says.

"High-input, resource-intensive farming systems, which have caused massive deforestation, water scarcities, soil depletion and high levels of greenhouse gas emissions, cannot deliver sustainable food and agricultural production," adds the report.

More with less
The core challenge is to produce more with less, while preserving and enhancing the livelihoods of small-scale and family farmers, and ensuring access to food by the most vulnerable.

For this, a twin-track approach is needed which combines investment in social protection, to immediately tackle undernourishment, and pro-poor investments in productive activities — especially agriculture and in rural economies — to sustainably increase income-earning opportunities of the poor.

The world will need to shift to more sustainable food systems which make more efficient use of land, water and other inputs and sharply reduce their use of fossil fuels, leading to a drastic cut of agricultural green-house gas emissions, greater conservation of biodiversity, and a reduction of waste.

This will necessitate more investment in agriculture and agrifood systems, as well as greater spending on research and development, the report says, to promote innovation, support sustainable production increases, and find better ways to cope with issues like water scarcity and climate change.

Along with boosting production and resilience, equally critical will be creating food supply chains that better connect farmers in low- and middle-income countries to urban markets — along with measures which ensure access for consumers to nutritious and safe food at affordable prices, such as such as pricing policies and social protection programs, it says.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

February 21, 2017

Balaguer Rolls company profile



Founded in 1916, Balaguer Rolls is a family business specialising in the casting and machining of centrifugal rolls for milling and a range of other industries, including compound feed, soybeans, coffee, chocolate, paint, salt, biscuits, chemicals and more. 

Throughout the company's history, Balaguer has earned the trust of many of the largest food machinery manufacturers worldwide:  Balaguer rolls have been incorporated into roller mills around the globe. 
Balaguer also supplies rolls to end-users - flourmills, edible oil factories and such like - in no fewer than 120 countries.

Visit the website
 HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

22/02/2017: Open-mouth bags verses valve bags

by Thomas Ziolko, Product Manager - Grain Milling, Bühler AG, Switzerland

The decision of whether to use open-mouth bags or valve bags when bagging product in the grain processing or feed industries is influenced by diverse factors

 
www.buhlergroup.com
The trend is toward open-mouth bags. In Europe, North America and Australia, grain milling products are mostly filled into tank trucks in bulk. In Latin America, Africa and Asia, in contrast, bagging into open-mouth or valve bags is predominant.

However, in the recent past, there is a clear trend away from valve bags towards open ones. This is driven above all by the international availability of less expensive open-mouth bags, an easier filling process and the option of dust-tight closures which parallel the trend to greater food safety.

Not all bags are alike
Compared to the open-mouth bags, the upper part of the valve bags is almost completely closed. The valve bags have just one small opening; the ‘valve’ in which to fill the bag. As soon as the bag is full, the interior pressure of the bag closes the valve to stop product from spilling over.

Open-mouth bags are closed along the lengthwise side and on the bag bottom. They can be made of paper or plastic. They are easily filled and can be sealed by welding, sewing or gluing so nothing trickles out.

A big variety of bag types can be used. The side fold bags fill out in the shape of a block thanks to the inserted side fold that makes them very easy to stack. The cross bottom bags are particularly easy to stand alone or stack after filling because of their bottoms.

They are also effective for advertising because the bottom and sides of the bag can be printed. Laminated bags of woven polypropylene can also be printed in good quality and are available as a pinch bag.


Read the full article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

22/02/2017: New Cimbria office in Morocco

In line with the CIMBRIA sales strategy of having a local representation in all primary markets, CIMBRIA has set up a new office in Casablanca, Morocco starting from February, the 1st 2017

CIMBRIA has already several references in Morocco in both the private and public sector.

With the new office, they aim at increasing the sales activities and ensure an even better service and after-sales service to their clients.

 
Mr Hicham Fassihi
The daily management of the office in Morocco is carried out by Mr Hicham FASSIHI, electro mechanical expert with almost 20 years of experience in Italy in the agro-industrial field, including four years as SEA optical sorters technical support.

CIMBRIA is one of the world’s leading companies within industrial processing, handling and storage of grain and seed, as well as animal feed and foodstuffs and other bulk products.

They offer project design, engineering and process control – as well as the development, manufacturing and service of individual machines, customised systems and turnkey installations.

In all solutions, they focus on increasing quality and profitability while reducing energy consumption.

In this way, they achieve maximum profitability of the machine with minimal environmental impacts.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com