December 08, 2016

Maxi-Lift company profile

For more than 35 years, Maxi-Lift, Inc. has built superior elevator buckets by exceeding customer expectations. 

The Maxi-Lift name means unmatched service, customised solutions, engineered quality, and fast delivery. 

Their elevator buckets are in operation around the world, moving everything from aggregate to zinc, because they put the customer first.

According to Maxi-Lift, "We have a management team dedicated to serving our customers with quality products and fast delivery."


"From friendly customer service to technical support, our staff is here to serve you. Take a few minutes to meet some of our experienced and friendly staff".

Visit the website HERE
 

The Global Miller

This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT

which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.

For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

09/12/2016: Alapala receives multiple awards at Anatolian Brands Competition

Alapala has received two more awards for its industrial success.

İsmail Alapala, Chairman of Alapala receiving Anatolian Brands’ Award
“Anatolian Brands Competition” was held for the 9th time this year, by Capital and Economist magazines.

Alapala received an award in the manufacturing category.

The companies were evaluated in terms of their export growth rate, capacity and financial turnover.


Another award was given to the Turkish Machinery Association.

The Honour Awards were awarded to companies which have more than 50 years of experience in the machinery industry.

Read about Alapala HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

09/12/2016: Meeting of the International Grains Council

Members of the International Grains Council (IGC) convened for the 44th Council Session on 5 December 2016.

The meeting was chaired by Mr Aly Toure, Permanent Representative of Côte d'Ivoire to International Commodity Organisations, London.

The latest supply and demand outlook and market developments for grains, rice and oilseeds were assessed (based on GMR 472), while recent changes in national policies and administrative matters were considered.
 

Led by all-time highs for wheat and maize, world total grains (wheat and coarse grains) production was seen reaching a record 2,084m t in 2016/17, an increase of 81m y/y (year-on-year).

A strong rise in consumption was predicted to a new peak of 2,056m t (+73m y/y), as large supplies and attractive prices boost feeding, while population growth contributes to higher food demand.

A solid gain in industrial processing was also anticipated, mainly for ethanol and starch.

Wheat and maize (corn) were expected to account for nearly all of a projected stocks expansion, with the global carryover above 500m for the first time. Despite a potential record for wheat, a 6m t retreat in grains trade was foreseen, to 338m, owing to reductions for barley and sorghum.

Northern hemisphere planting of winter wheat was well advanced by early December, with the preliminary forecast for world 2017/18 all-wheat harvested area showing little y/y change. Crop conditions were reported to be mostly favourable ahead of the winter.

With bumper crops expected in leading Asian producers, world rice output was seen rising by three percent, to an all-time high of 485m t. And despite an anticipated increase in total use, aggregate end-season stocks were predicted to edge higher as a contraction in the major exporters was more than offset by gains elsewhere, notably in China.

Traded volumes in 2017 were expected to grow by two percent on firm demand from key importers in Asia and Africa, with India again expected to be the largest exporter.

Global soyabean production was forecast up by seven percent y/y, to a peak of 336m t, including record crops in the US, where harvesting was complete, and Brazil.

Although total uptake was anticipated to expand further, led by Asia, a solid increase in world carryovers was likely, linked to significant accumulation in the US.

Trade was forecast to grow by three percent, to a fresh peak of 137m t, with shipments to China accounting for about two-thirds of the total.

The IGC Grains and Oilseeds Prices Index (GOI) was only modestly above year earlier levels, with declines for wheat, barley and rice, but increases for maize and soyabeans.

Pressured by ample availabilities, average wheat prices were close to 10-year lows, barley were the weakest in around six seasons, while rice quotations were the lowest in about nine years.

Soyabean markets, by contrast, were significantly higher y/y, as support from strong export interest more than offset pressure from a heavy supply outlook.

Slightly stronger maize values y/y mainly reflected nearby supply tightness in South America, but a record harvest was pressuring US quotations.

The Council also noted the impact on grains, rice and oilseeds prices of heightened volatility in currencies, logistical problems in some areas and a recent upturn in ocean freight costs.

Although dry bulk freight markets had staged some recovery in 2016, to touch near-two year highs in November, the Baltic Dry Index was still nearly 90% below its May 2008 all-time peak amid excess tonnage capacity.

The Council considered administrative matters, including an update on progress with its economic work programme. The Secretariat presented its medium-term supply and demand projections (covering the period to 2021/22).

Some retreat in grains, rice and oilseeds stocks was anticipated, but global availabilities were seen remaining mostly comfortable over the next five years. Representing the IGTC, Dr Parry Dixon, Senior Economist, ADM provided an update on the current developments in policy and trade practice.

The Council received statements from the FAO, OECD, WFP and WTO on recent developments, and welcomed the participation of Taipei (Chinese) Separate Customs Territory as an observer.

In conjunction with the Council Session, there was a Round Table discussion with the theme “Are low prices a cure for low prices?” Panellists shared their expert opinions on the current situation and highlighted potential factors and scenarios that could influence international markets in future years.Members of the International Grains Council (IGC) convened for the 44th Council Session on 5 December 2016. 


The meeting was chaired by Mr Aly Toure, Permanent Representative of Côte d'Ivoire to International Commodity Organisations, London.

The latest supply and demand outlook and market developments for grains, rice and oilseeds were assessed (based on GMR 472), while recent changes in national policies and administrative matters were considered.

Led by all-time highs for wheat and maize, world total grains (wheat and coarse grains) production was seen reaching a record 2,084m t in 2016/17, an increase of 81m y/y (year-on-year).

A strong rise in consumption was predicted to a new peak of 2,056m t (+73m y/y), as large supplies and attractive prices boost feeding, while population growth contributes to higher food demand.

A solid gain in industrial processing was also anticipated, mainly for ethanol and starch.

Wheat and maize (corn) were expected to account for nearly all of a projected stocks expansion, with the global carryover above 500m for the first time. Despite a potential record for wheat, a 6m t retreat in grains trade was foreseen, to 338m, owing to reductions for barley and sorghum.

Northern hemisphere planting of winter wheat was well advanced by early December, with the preliminary forecast for world 2017/18 all-wheat harvested area showing little y/y change. Crop conditions were reported to be mostly favourable ahead of the winter.

With bumper crops expected in leading Asian producers, world rice output was seen rising by three percent, to an all-time high of 485m t. And despite an anticipated increase in total use, aggregate end-season stocks were predicted to edge higher as a contraction in the major exporters was more than offset by gains elsewhere, notably in China.

Traded volumes in 2017 were expected to grow by two percent on firm demand from key importers in Asia and Africa, with India again expected to be the largest exporter.

Global soyabean production was forecast up by seven percent y/y, to a peak of 336m t, including record crops in the US, where harvesting was complete, and Brazil.

Although total uptake was anticipated to expand further, led by Asia, a solid increase in world carryovers was likely, linked to significant accumulation in the US.

Trade was forecast to grow by three percent, to a fresh peak of 137m t, with shipments to China accounting for about two-thirds of the total.

The IGC Grains and Oilseeds Prices Index (GOI) was only modestly above year earlier levels, with declines for wheat, barley and rice, but increases for maize and soyabeans.

Pressured by ample availabilities, average wheat prices were close to 10-year lows, barley were the weakest in around six seasons, while rice quotations were the lowest in about nine years.

Soyabean markets, by contrast, were significantly higher y/y, as support from strong export interest more than offset pressure from a heavy supply outlook.

Slightly stronger maize values y/y mainly reflected nearby supply tightness in South America, but a record harvest was pressuring US quotations.

The Council also noted the impact on grains, rice and oilseeds prices of heightened volatility in currencies, logistical problems in some areas and a recent upturn in ocean freight costs.

Although dry bulk freight markets had staged some recovery in 2016, to touch near-two year highs in November, the Baltic Dry Index was still nearly 90% below its May 2008 all-time peak amid excess tonnage capacity.

The Council considered administrative matters, including an update on progress with its economic work programme. The Secretariat presented its medium-term supply and demand projections (covering the period to 2021/22).

Some retreat in grains, rice and oilseeds stocks was anticipated, but global availabilities were seen remaining mostly comfortable over the next five years. Representing the IGTC, Dr Parry Dixon, Senior Economist, ADM provided an update on the current developments in policy and trade practice.

The Council received statements from the FAO, OECD, WFP and WTO on recent developments, and welcomed the participation of Taipei (Chinese) Separate Customs Territory as an observer.

In conjunction with the Council Session, there was a Round Table discussion with the theme “Are low prices a cure for low prices?” Panellists shared their expert opinions on the current situation and highlighted potential factors and scenarios that could influence international markets in future years.

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

09/12/2016: Food safety research at EuroTier 2016

Pre-harvest Nutritional Health versus Foodborne Pathogens

Global nutritional health company Diamond V summarised recent research on Salmonella, Campylobacter, and E. coli in live poultry at the recent EuroTier international animal industry tradeshow in Hanover, Germany.
 
www.diamondv.com

If farmers can reduce these pathogenic bacteria in the gastro-intestinal tracts of animals on the farm, then they can help reduce the risk of pathogens in food processing and food products.

Diamond V's Dr Wael Abdelrahman explored key scientific advances in the emerging field of pre-harvest food safety. He discussed nutritional health solutions to reduce pathogens in live poultry and the reduction of antimicrobial resistance in those pathogens.

Dr Abdelrahman is the Poultry Technical Service & Business Development Manager for Diamond V in Europe. His areas of special expertise include poultry gut health and immunology, with a focus on optimal poultry production, health risk mitigation, and food safety.

On poultry farms, Dr Abdelrahman told journalists at EuroTier, conventional approaches such as increased biosecurity, better hygiene, changes to management and husbandry, and improved feed microbial security can help to control foodborne pathogens.

However, going forward, major improvements in pathogen risk reduction required new tools to assure greater food safety. Farmers needed innovative nutritional health solutions, Dr Abdelrahman said.

They needed technologies that were research-proven, field-confirmed, and farm-ready in order to optimise food safety in the 'pre-harvest' phase of food production, prior to processing.

He added that effective pre-harvest food safety intervention against foodborne pathogens in poultry and other food animals, requires proven reduction in:

• Prevalence -- proportion (%) of animal population infected at a particular point of time
• Number -- measure of viable bacterial cells (CFU/g, log10, MPN) in collected samples, which multiplied by pathogen prevalence indicates "pathogen load"
• Virulence -- ability to cause disease, which indicates the likelihood that someone consuming infected product will become sick
• Antibiotic resistance -- ability to survive, reproduce, and cause disease despite antibiotic therapy that had controlled such infection in the past, so that reducing antibiotic resistance increases the likelihood that someone who is infected will respond to therapy

Reduction in the load of pathogens such as Salmonella, Campylobacter, and E. coli entering the processing facility, Dr Abdelrahman said, can result in lower costs and improved regulatory compliance for the food processor.

Reduced pathogen load also helps reduce the risk of product recall, which helps maintain brand integrity and consumer confidence. Effective pre-harvest food safety intervention, Dr Abdelrahman said, has further potential to improve animal and human health.

Meeting the criteria of reduced virulence and antibiotic resistance means that pathogenic bacteria on the farm may become less of a health risk to farm animals, farmers, workers, and consumers, which can lead to less overall antibiotic usage on farms and more efficacious usage if antibiotics prove necessary.

Nutritional health research published by Diamond V focuses on immunity, digestive health, performance, and pre-harvest food safety, Dr Abdelrahman noted.

More than 125 peer-reviewed published scientific journal articles support the use of Diamond V products in poultry, pigs, dairy and beef cattle, aquaculture species, and other food animals. These products do not treat or prevent diseases, Dr Abdelrahman said.

Rather, they support health and wellness naturally. Responsibility for safe food begins on the farm and continues throughout the food supply chain all the way to the consumer, Dr Abdelrahman pointed out.

He noted that Diamond V leads in the emerging field of pre-harvest food safety and that nutritional health technologies such as Diamond V's Original XPC™ help assure safe food while providing a natural, non-antibiotic solution for poultry producers.

Wael Abdelrahman, DVM, MVSc, PhD Following completion of his DVM and Master of Veterinary Science in poultry diseases at Suez Canal University in Egypt, Dr Abdelrahman received his PhD from the Royal Veterinary College (Veterinary Epidemiology and Public Health Group) at the University of London where he has maintained a teaching role as a guest lecturer on poultry health.

Dr Abdelrahman has authored numerous publications and peer-reviewed articles, and co-authored a book on probiotics in poultry production. He has particular interest in how feed ingredients can be used to help reduce antibiotic usage and reduce bacterial resistance to antibiotics.

Diamond V
Diamond V is a leading global nutrition and health company with headquarters and all manufacturing in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, USA.

Diamond V conducts research in many species and supplies unique, natural, fermentation-based products and expertise to improve animal health, animal performance, and food safety worldwide.

More than 70 years of science, innovation, technology, and quality have earned Diamond V the reputation of The Trusted Experts in Nutrition and Health®.

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

The december edition of Milling and Grain magazine is now available





Back issues available

08/12/2016: The operational activity of Milling4Life makes a flying start

by Clifford Spencer

The M4L (Milling4Life) team has just returned from the IAOM event in Ethiopia, where I am happy to report that our initial launch activity went smoothly, and more importantly, we have started to build interest in a potential project to address our objectives on improving human nutrition on the African continent.
 
Developing African states, in particular Ethiopia in Sub-Saharan Africa, is home to some of the most nutritionally insecure people in the world.
 
Clifford Spencer

While food availability is clearly important to achieving food security, having the means to effectively access and utilise quality food remains central to good nutrition.

Protein-energy malnutrition is observed most frequently in developing countries such as Ethiopia. During our visit to the IAOM we had interesting discussions with the Ethiopian Millers Association and benefited from the skilled input of their vice-President on a proposal to boost the use of a successful Ethiopian crop (Beans) as a protein source for direct human nutrition and also as a protein based feed for domestic fish production for the population of Ethiopia.

Aquaculture has the potential of producing large quantities of lower-cost, protein rich food; whilst at the same time contributing to the livelihoods of the rural poor because it generates food of high value.

Aquaculture therefore is the most important source of growth in fish supply for human consumption.

However in Ethiopia fish protein accounts for 0.1 percent of protein in the diet, and nearly all is sourced from fisheries as opposed to aquaculture, which is a nascent industry in Ethiopia.

The skill of the miller
What ensued was a prime example of the skill of the miller being brought to bear on the most significant problem facing the 100 million strong Ethiopian population i.e. feeding themselves with a healthy life giving diet.

The regular provision of high quality protein is essential for human life and especially for pregnant women and in particular their children in the important formative first few years of their life.

Helpfully Ethiopia is the second largest producer of Faba beans globally but there is much to do to make them suitable for various forms of human consumption. Firstly Faba beans have an anti-nutritional compound in their shell so its removal is a key process for the miller.

Also pin-milling of faba bean seeds, either whole or de-hulled, produces flours that contain two distinct populations of particles of size and density. Using air-classification separation techniques produces a protein concentrate (the light fraction) and a starchy flour (the heavy fraction).
 


Helpfully the application of air-classification techniques to grain legume processing has relatively low capital requirements and removes the need for costly effluent disposal operations. As a guide the composition of the protein “light” fraction and starch “heavy” fraction obtained by passing the seeds through the pin-mill and air classifier is given in the table below.

We can then by example, through the skill of the miller, use the bean flour as the basis for producing a pelleted fish feed that is nutritionally balanced (with the required additional inputs) in tailored rations.

This is to provide the desired rapid growth in the fish being fed. We will need to see the establishment of complimentary fish feeding trials in Ethiopia to provide experience and data to allow a successful industrial development.

However in this respect and through the Ethiopian government we are already in conversation with the United Nations Industrial Development Organisation program manager for aquaculture development in Ethiopia.

We are also currently in discussions with UK and EU funders for this programme and an Ethiopian miller is a potential recipient of funding for the milling side of this development.


Read the full article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

VIGAN company profile




VIGAN manufactures bulk materials handling systems, mainly:
  • Mobile pneumatic conveyors or vacuvators or grain pumps.
  • Pneumatic continuous barge unloaders and mechanical barge loaders.
  • Mechanical and pneumatic continuous ship unloaders for vessels up to post-Panamax.
  • Mechanical loaders for any size of ships.
VIGAN Engineering S.A is a Belgian company with its headquarters in Nivelles industrial area about 30 kilometres south of Brussels at the heart of the European Community.

VIGAN manufactures a complete range of pneumatic and mechanical conveying systems for products in bulk not only thanks to the supply machines but also by managing complete turnkey projects.

Nivelles city is easily accessible due to its proximity to European highways and about one hour drive to the port of Antwerp which allows excellent transport conditions for all its equipment to foreign countries.


All the company activities take place on the same 10,000 m² site which enables easy and very quick exchange of information among all departments including sales, engineering, manufacturing, quality control and after-sales technical assistance. VIGAN engineering department with 450 m² space boasts latest software technologies (such as CAO – CAM types)

According to the Vigan website, “For any free flowing materials like cereals, grains, seeds, animal feed, alumina, petro coke, chemicals, industry raw materials, VIGAN is your engineering partner and your solution provider”.

“VIGAN excellence is also recognized by hundreds of international references.
As an affiliate company from VAN DE WIELE group (which has an annual turnover of about 400 million USD and about 2,000 workers and employees in more than 10 different countries) and with more than 30 years of experience, VIGAN is a most reliable partner from your project ideas to their full completion and for your total satisfaction thanks to its service excellence and equipment performances.”

Visit the website HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com