April 25, 2017

26/04/2017: Nutriad appoints technical manager in China

Multinational feed additive producer Nutriad announced the appointment of Dr Wei Wang as Technical Manager for China

Dr Wei Wang
 As part of an ongoing strategy to increase its presence in this dynamic market, Nutriad continues to invest in building technical and commercial support teams in China, allowing them to further improve their constant engagement and support to customers.

BK Chew, APAC Director Nutriad, commented ‘China is the main growth engine within APAC and the appointment of Dr Wang will enable increased technical support for our applications in mycotoxin management and gut health.”

Dr Wei completed a total of 10 years of studies in animal nutrition, obtaining a BSc in Animal Science at Southwest University of Science & Technology, a MSc in Swine Nutrition at Sichuan Agriculture University and PhD in Applied Biological Science, Swine Nutrition at Ghent University.

Dr Wang said, “I have always been fascinated by converting scientific knowledge on animal nutrition and health into practical solutions. As such I have admired Nutriad from the outside for many years and am excited to now become part of the Chinese team and support the company on its next steps in China.” 


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

Yenar company profile




With more than 20 years experience in the sector, Yenar have a state of the art production plant on an area of 40,000 m2, of which 18,000 m2 is covered. 

Domestic and global leaders since 1995, Yenar's equipment range includes rolls manufactured using the most up to date technology by means of the double pour centrifugal casting method. These rolls are in demand in many food sectors. 

Manufacturing 22,000 units annually of various diameters and lengths as of 2014, Yenar is the fastest growing Turkish company in the sector, supplying hundreds of food sector producers in both domestic and foreign markets by means of professional sales teams. 


Visit the website HERE
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

26/04/2017: Enzymes for enhancing flour quality

by Pinar Erdal, Research & Development Manager of Mirpain Bakery Ingredients, Turkey

Bread, is the most widely consumed food in the world and its main ingredient is flour


For making bread, the most consumed flour is Wheat Flour and the most important value of wheat is its quality. The quality of the wheat flour depends on its compounds which depends on wheat variety its compounds, which means depending on wheat variety, harvest season (winter or spring), climatic effects (rainfall), storage conditions-durations, crop and after crop treatment, planting regime, biological effects and so on.

These conditions affect the bread's characteristics like crumb and crust colour even and smooth crumb texture, higher water absorption, uniform loaf shape, better-knife opening and higher tolerance to various processes.
 


When your flour cannot meet these factors, functional ingredients especially ultra concentrated enzymes that catalyse chemical reactions in the case of flour/dough, take a big role in improving the flour.

As a result of being ultra concentrated, when a little enzyme is used it yields desired effects on the flour quality. For example, they enhance gas production by yeasts and can help control the strength of the dough. Each enzyme acts upon only one specific substrate and ignores the others.

Like proteins, they have an optimum temperature and ph to react. On top of these factors, water content, enzyme amount, substrate content and the given time for reaction are also important. Also it is known that amylases and xylanases are the enzymes most added to dough.

Amylases
Most widely used, Amylases are reported as being the first enzymes to be added to bread dough. They are also the topic of most current research on enzymes in dough. While the initial use was for generating fermentable sugars (increasing gassing power), current interest focuses on their ability to delay crumb firming, the anti-staling effect.

Amylases action on damaged starch granules produces dextrins and oligosaccharides. The key factor of amylase in wheat flour is to break down complex starches into simple sugars. The presence of amylase is essential for fermentation of dough because yeast requires simple sugars to produce carbon dioxide.

Although flour contains a tiny amount of sugar, one to two percent, this amount is not enough to make dough rise during fermentation. However, wheat kernels contain naturally occurring alpha amylase because they need to break starch molecule into sugar to have the needed energy during the germinating of the kernels.

The amount of naturally occurring amylase is affected by wheat variety, harvest season (winter or spring), climatic effects (rainfall), storage conditions-durations, crop and after-crop treatment, planting regime, as well as biological effects of the wheat. Falling Number Method is a key analysis to determine the quality of flour by figuring out indirectly the alpha amylase activity.

In the case of deficiency in naturally occurring amylase, the flour is supplemented by adding commercially available amylases or it is possible to blend flours to balance the amount of amylases.


Read the full article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

26/04/2017: Sonny Perdue Sworn in as 31st US Secretary of Agriculture

Sonny Perdue was sworn in as the 31st US Secretary of Agriculture by fellow Georgian and Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court Clarence Thomas in a brief ceremony today at the Supreme Court building

The US Senate confirmed Secretary Perdue by a vote of 87-to-11 on Monday evening.

After Secretary Perdue took the oath of office, he addressed employees at the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) before getting to work on his first day. Also this morning, USDA launched his official Twitter handle: @SecretarySonny. 

 
Sonny Perdue, with his wife Mary, takes the oath of office
administered by Associate Justice Clarence Thomas
in the US Supreme Court Building, becoming the 31st US
Secretary of Agriculture. 
“The only legacy that I seek is the only one that any grandparent or parent seeks – to be good stewards, and to hand off our nation, our home, our fields, our forests, and our farms to the next generation in better shape than we found it,” Mr Perdue said.

“Making sure that Americans who make their livelihoods in the agriculture industry have the ability to thrive will be one of my top priorities. I am committed to serving the customers of USDA, and I will be an unapologetic advocate for American agriculture.”

Mr Perdue’s policies as US Secretary of Agriculture will be guided by four principles which will inform his decisions.

First, he will maximise the ability of the men and women of America’s agriculture and agribusiness sector to create jobs, to produce and sell the foods and fibre that feed and clothe the world, and to reap the earned reward of their labour.

It should be the aim of the American government to remove every obstacle and give farmers, ranchers, and producers every opportunity to prosper. Second, he will prioritise customer service every day for American taxpayers and consumers. They will expect, and have every right to demand, that their government conduct the people’s business efficiently, effectively, and with the utmost integrity.

Third, as Americans expect a safe and secure food supply, USDA will continue to serve in the critical role of ensuring the food we put on the table to feed our families meets the strict safety standards we’ve established. Food security is a key component of national security, because hunger and peace do not long coexist.

And fourth, Mr Perdue will always remember that America’s agricultural bounty comes directly from the land. And today, those land resources sustain more than 320 million Americans and countless millions more around the globe.

Mr Perdue’s father’s words still ring true, we’re all stewards of the land, owned or rented, and our responsibility is to leave it better than we found it.

“As secretary, I will champion the concerns of farmers, ranchers, foresters, and producers, and will work tirelessly to solve the issues facing our farm families,” Mr Perdue said.

“I am proud to have been given this opportunity and look forward to rolling up my sleeves and getting to work as we continue to move the USDA and our nation forward.”

Upon nominating Secretary Perdue in January, President Donald J. Trump said, “Sonny Perdue is going to accomplish great things as Secretary of Agriculture. From growing up on a farm to being governor of a big agriculture state, he has spent his whole life understanding and solving the challenges our farmers face, and he is going to deliver big results for all Americans who earn their living off the land.”

About Secretary Perdue

Sonny Perdue came by his knowledge of agriculture the old fashioned way, he was born into a farming family in Bonaire, Georgia.

From childhood, and through his life in business and elected office, Mr Perdue has experienced the industry from every possible perspective. Uniquely qualified as a former farmer, agribusinessman, veterinarian, state legislator, and governor of Georgia, he became the 31st United States Secretary of Agriculture on April 25, 2017.

Additionally, Mr Perdue recognises that American agriculture needs a strong advocate to promote its interests to international markets. The United States is blessed to be able to produce more than its citizens can consume, which implies that we should sell the bounty around the world.

The relationship between the USDA and its trade representatives, as well as with the US Trade Representative and Department of Commerce, will be vital. The work of promoting American agricultural products to other countries will begin with those relationships and will benefit us domestically, just as it will fulfill the moral imperative of helping to feed the world.

Mr Perdue has pledged to be an unapologetic advocate for American agriculture. Under Secretary Perdue, the USDA will always be facts-based and data-driven, with a decision-making mindset that is customer-focused.

He will seek solutions to problems and not lament that the department might be faced with difficult challenges. As a youngster growing up on a dairy and diversified row crop farm in rural Georgia, Mr Perdue never fully realised that the blessings of purposeful, meaningful work would serve him as well as they have in life. When he was a young boy feeding the calves and plowing the fields, he was an integral part of the workforce on his father’s farm.

As the son of a mother who was an English teacher for 42 years, he benefitted from her teachings as well – not just by instilling in him the beliefs he still holds dear, but also by lending him an appreciation and respect for language and proper grammar. But more than anything in his life, it was the family farm which shaped Sonny Perdue.

He has lived and breathed the exhilaration of a great crop and the despair and devastation of a drought. He learned by experience what his father told him as a child, “If you take care of the land, the land will take care of you.”

The work ethic cemented in him by his farming roots has remained with Sonny Perdue throughout his life. As a younger man, he served his country in the US Air Force, rising to the rank of Captain. After earning a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine from the University of Georgia, he put that training to use in private practice in North Carolina.

As a member of the Georgia State Senate for eleven years, he eventually ascended to the position of President Pro Tempore as elected by his senate colleagues. As a two-term governor of Georgia, he was credited with transforming a budget deficit into a surplus, dramatically increasing the student performance in public schools, and fostering an economic environment that allowed employers to flourish and manufacturers and agricultural producers to achieve record levels of exports.

He followed these accomplishments with a successful career in agribusiness, where he focused on commodities and transportation in enterprises that have spanned the southeastern United States. These experiences have proven invaluable in his current role as principal advocate for American agriculture and all that it serves.

Mr Perdue is a strong believer in good government, in that it should operate efficiently and serve the needs of its customers: the people of the United States. As a state senator, he was recognised as a leading authority on issues including energy and utilities, agriculture, transportation, emerging technologies and economic development, and for his ability to grasp the nuances of complex problems.

As governor, he reformed state budget priorities, helped Georgians create more than 200,000 new jobs, and promoted his home state around the world to attract new businesses. In 2009, the Reason Foundation’s Innovators in Action magazine recognised Mr Perdue as a leader who “aggressively pursued new strategies to increase the effectiveness and efficiency of government and deliver better value at less cost to taxpayers.”

In addition, he was named “Public Official of the Year” in October 2010 by Governing Magazine. To this day, his thoughts are never very far from the wishes of the citizens – the true owners of the government.

Mr Perdue’s views on agriculture have always been shaped by his first-hand knowledge of all of its aspects, both as a farmer and as an agribusinessman. He appreciates the daily concerns and needs of American farmers, while also understanding the intricacies of global commodities markets.

He is acknowledged as a national leader in agriculture, having served as a board member for the National Grain & Feed Association, and as President of both the Georgia Feed and Grain Association and the Southeastern Feed and Grain Association.

Mr Perdue has long-standing, close relationships with the leadership of the National Farm Bureau and has been recognised by the Georgia 4-H and FFA programs, among others, for his leadership in agriculture.

As the product of Georgia, a state where agriculture is the leading economic driver, Mr Perdue recognises that agriculture is an issue and industry which cuts across political party boundaries. He recognises that the size, scope, and diversity of America’s agricultural sector requires reaching across the aisle so that partisanship doesn’t get in the way of good solutions for American farmers, ranchers, and consumers.

Mr Perdue has been married to Mary Ruff Perdue for 44 years and has four adult children and fourteen grandchildren. He and his wife have served as foster parents for eight children awaiting adoption. Mr Perdue remains a licensed airplane and helicopter pilot and avid outdoor sportsman.

You can follow Secretary Perdue on Twitter, HERE.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

April 24, 2017

25/04/2017: Ukraine: a future agricultural frontrunner?

by Christophe Palletier

This month I have had the privilege to visit Kiev for the very first time to see first-hand something of Ukraine’s agricultural industry
 
Christophe Palletier

In a country with more than 4272 million hectares of productive land and a population of only 42.5 million people, agriculture makes up a major part of their GDP.

In a system where land cannot be bought or sold, the farming companies have to negotiate leases from the freeholders - who usually own very small parcels of land.

The local landowners who individually own very few acres seem very willing to lease their share to some very major corporations, some of who have turnovers running into billions of dollars.

The country itself is rapidly developing its very significant rural economy to rank ‘top 10 exporters of foodstuffs worldwide.
 


Its major customers being China, India, Turkey and the EU, outside of which it still remains. 60 percent of its production comes from two regions, Mykolaiv and Potava, with maize/corn, wheat and barley being its main cereal based crops, all responsible for some 60 million tonnes per year.

Potatoes however, are the main vegetable crop along with sugar beet and vegetables.

It can be believed that with improving road and logistics, this country will become even more influential in the world’s agriculture economy.

As well as producing crops, livestock has a major influence - with poultry the main product, annually producing about 1144 million tonnes of which 7 percent is for export, with pig production taking second place at 760 million tonnes, most of which is consumed at home.

Unlike the western palate, fat meat is sought after. Because of the countries land borders and large-scale intensive units, disease spread is a major problem.

This is compounded by a lack of bio-security with many workers having a few pigs at home and a large wild pig population. African swine fever is a major problem, which hopefully will be abated with the help of geneticists who are looking for the health gene, successful vaccination programmes along with increased bio-security.

This in addition with the uptake of correct disposal of dead and diseased animals, the outbreaks can be limited and arrested.

Not to mention the training of staff, which plays a key role in any successful control measures in raising awareness, control and prevention.


Read the full article, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

Golfetto Sangati company profile




Over the last century, the Group’s history has followed the interweaving stories of its three consituent companies. These disparate paths have led to the current Golfetto Sangati, a company that represents the culmination of a long journey that started in the Twenties.

Golfetto, originally founded in Padua, specialised in the engineering of cereal manufacturing plants. Its foundation is the starting point from which all future events took place. It was followed by Sangati’s foundation, in 1929, a company that in just a few years became a renowned name in the milling industry.


In 1952, Berga S.p.A. was set up. At first the company specialized in milling machines and silos. It then widened its business to animal feed production. During the seventies it became a recognised leader in the engineering and building of mills, animal feed plants, cereal storage and handling for harbour terminals. The company expanded even further with the opening of new branches in Europe and Northern Africa.
 

Visit the website HERE.

25/04/2017: Marketing professionals learn grain purchasing concepts

Participants gain knowledge of grain purchasing and apply information first-hand at an exporting facility

Effectively buying US food and feed grains can benefit those individuals in private companies who are new to US and international marketing, as well as to those with a moderate understanding of marketing.
 
Participants tour the Cargill Westwego export facility
in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Industry professionals were able to experience this firsthand during the two-week IGP–KSU Grain Purchasing course held April 3-14, 2017.

This course was offered at the IGP Institute Conference Centre and included a visit to the Cargill Westwego export facility on the Mississippi River in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Participants in this course learned how grain is traded and exported during the first week. This included USDA grading standards and how they are implemented, how to read USDA reports, how to establish a proper contract to get what you desire, international grain trade rules and international contracts and arbitration systems.

“With the interaction of the personnel from IGP and our teammates, I really think that we’ve not only built a strong relationship between all of us, but we’ve learned a lot from each other and each other’s experiences,” says Kamal Dieck, commercial director of Beneficio Dieck.

“Since it’s such a diverse group, you have wheat millers and managers, executives and people from both trading and purchasing departments. It really gives you a lot of great and useful knowledge of different aspects of the business.”

Participants in the course were primarily from Central and South America, the US and India. The participants from India were most interested in learning how to import high quality US hard red winter wheat.

The group also traveled to New Orleans to tour an export facility along the Mississippi River and apply their classroom knowledge to real-life operations. During the second week of the course, the group focused on commodity price risk management.

Topics in this section included the workings of commodity exchanges, futures and options trading, hedging and price risk management, discussions on forward contracting and options and over-the-counter (OTC) contracts and how they are applied to a risk management strategy.

The IGP Institute offers several other training courses in addition to grain marketing and risk management. The institute holds trainings in flour milling and grain processing, and feed manufacturing and grain quality management. 


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

24/04/2017: BIOMIN mycotoxin survey indicates higher mycotoxin risks in corn and feed in 2017

Mycotoxin-related threats to livestock production have risen in most regions of the world over the first quarter of 2017

 More than 14000 analyses were conducted on 3715 finished feed and raw commodity samples sourced from 54 countries from January to March 2017 as part of the BIOMIN Mycotoxin Survey.
 
www.biomin.net

Main trends
 There has been a recent rise in mycotoxin contamination levels observed for corn, finished feed and soy. Deoxynivalenol (DON), detected in 80 percent of samples, is the most prevalent mycotoxin worldwide, followed by fumonisins (FUM), found in 71 percent of samples. 76 percent of feed and raw commodity samples contained two or more mycotoxins.

Heightened risk

Reported mycotoxin occurrence data has shown that contamination levels in corn and finished feed samples have risen considerably in Europe and throughout the Western hemisphere. Risk levels in Asia remain elevated.

“Corn, or maize, constitutes a major proportion of animal feed and so trends in finished feed risk tends to match corn risk over time,” explained Dr Timothy Jenkins, Mycotoxin Risk Management Product Manager at BIOMIN.

Main culprits
The most prevalent mycotoxin in world feed is deoxynivalenol, a type B trichothecene produced by Fusarium graminearum and F. culmorum. Easily observed symptoms include reduced feed intake and feed refusal.

Two-thirds of samples contained deoxynivalenol in excess of 150 parts per billion (ppb): the risk threshold for effect on sensitive animals. 47 percent of samples contained F. verticillioides-produced fumonisins above 500 ppb: the risk threshold for effect on sensitive animals. Research has shown the combination of deoxynivalenol and fumonisins severely impair vaccine response and gut health.

Multiple mycotoxin presence
More than three-quarters of samples contained two or more mycotoxins. Multiple mycotoxin contamination of feed presents additional problems, as certain combinations of mycotoxins are known to have synergistic effects that aggravate the negative consequences for animals.

“The main Fusarium mycotoxins are frequently related to subclinical symptoms which are not very obvious on the surface but usually have a greater economic impact for the industry.” observed Dr Jenkins.

“The presence of several mycotoxins at low levels can silently impair productivity with poorer feed efficiency and low growth rates,” he added.

Industry solutions

“Avoidance of contaminated feed and attention to feed storage conditions are logical approaches to reducing the mycotoxin risk,” stated Dr Jenkins.

“However, mycotoxin contamination of feedstuffs occurs despite the most strenuous efforts on prevention. The most reliable approach is to combine prevention and detection with regular application of additives proven to adsorb or deactivate toxins in the intestinal tract of animals,” he advised.

About the survey

The annual BIOMIN Mycotoxin Survey constitutes the longest running and most comprehensive survey of its kind. The survey results provide insights on the incidence of the six major mycotoxins in the agricultural commodities used for livestock feed in order to identify the potential risk posed to livestock animal production. The full report can be found here.

Read more, HERE.

The full report can be found, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

April 23, 2017

Bastak company profile


Bastak was established in 1999 by the current Director, Mr Zeki Demirtasoglu as  Bastak Gida Makine Medikal Paz.Ith.Ihr.San.Tic.Ltd.Sti..
  
The company produces flour additives and quality control apparatus. Their aim is to be the market leader in the sector and to keep up with the latest innovations. The fundamental principle of the company is client satisfaction. For this purpose, no expense is spared in the quest for new technologies.


Bastak takes part in domestic and foreign fairs as both exhibitor and visitor in order to follow the most recent global developments and to introduce its own innovations.


The company expanded its horizons in 2003 by establishing its Foreign Trade Department and began to export. Bastak is aware that the only way to be able to exist in a dynamic global market is to produce consistently high quality products. For this reason, the company gives great importance to work studies and research.



Visit the website HERE.

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

24/04/2017: Biotechnology and scientific agricultural progress

by Clifford Spencer, Goodwill Ambassador, NEPAD and Chairman, Milling4Life

In my diplomatic role I have been spending the last few days interviewing senior bio-scientists from developing countries to gain their views and aspirations in their field of study
 
Clifford Spencer

It has been a fascinating experience and having preconceived ideas shattered barely describes the experience of these detailed conversations!

When discussing milling and grain-associated technologies, as well as developments the area of bioscience is assuming greater importance globally, it helps produce the grains or whichever crop is concerned but it also increasingly involved in the adding of value to waste streams or as they are now called, bi or co products.

The areas I was investigating in my interviews were green biotechnology (agriculture and forestry) and white (industrial) biotechnology, is about the use of living organisms and processes to achieve specific outcomes.

Composting, bread-making, molecular plant breeding and brewing are all biotechnologies whereas the general public often seems to think it is all about this genetic modification of organisms. What really stood out in the interviews were not only the enhanced scientific rate of progress in developing countries but also the very significant pool of home grown scientific talent.

This was accompanied by an immense desire by the interviewees to energise their home countries and social development. This bodes very well for future Milling4Life supported projects, as clearly the necessary homegrown and in-location talent required to give successful outcomes is ready and willing to act.

This is a significantly different position to when I was young and projects in developing countries were often conceived and driven externally, never being adopted into the countries in the hoped for way.

Often these projects were also exploitative and shunned by the local population who were integrated into them, other than possibly as cheap labour or as a means to secure and use an overseas asset.

All this potential bodes very well for milling industries in emerging countries in terms of the large range of indigenous grains available for development.

To date, these crops have benefitted from very little scientific input in terms of breeding effort in comparison to the current crops of soy, wheat or rice.

Also, bi or co product lines and associated processing techniques are areas of potential development for these under-explored crops.

Read the full article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

April 20, 2017

Max Porter (Mysilo) company profile



Installing a grain storage facility is a very complicated operation. Many parameters need to be considered, such as climate conditions, features of the stored grain and specific loading and unloading requirements.

This is where the Mysilo team comes in, both as a consulting service and also for installing your turn-key facility. 

Supplied by the world’s finest steel mills, the high-strength galvanized steel used in Mysilo’s construction work is shaped in their own entirely computerised workshops. 

Visit the Mysilo website HERE
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

21/04/2017: Asia’s food future: a fresh perspective

Geo-Political issues affecting Asia’s agri-food sector 

by Raghaven 'Ragha' Sampathkumar

2017 brought big surprises in terms of ideological “U” turns. A relatively recent entrant into the global trade, which remained a close economy for a long time, voiced its ardent support for a more globalised world.
 
Raghaven
Sampathkumar

Contrastingly, one of the foremost and founding members of several global, multilateral and inter-governmental organisations started turning inwards, shunning free trade and stepping back from several agreements.

It is even more surprising to see those in the highest echelons of politics in the country being selectively and shockingly oblivious of this simple fact: A massive amount of its agricultural production is exported.

For example, nearly half of all agricultural exports from the State of Illinois go to the countries that were negotiating the TPP (Trans Pacific Partnership).

Macro-Level Geo-political Issues

Nevertheless, leaving trade statistics to the number crunchers, I wish to touch upon a few other macro-level geo-political issues that could have significant impacts on the global milling and commodity trade sectors.

Although diets across Asia, driven by growth in incomes over the last few decades, are moving towards higher intake of animal protein, recent geo-political developments pose significant challenges to existing trade arrangements.

Firstly, the rise of a new breed of leaders in South East Asia with seemingly nationalistic dispositions has already reflected itself in barriers erupted for grain trade, although its impact was felt higher in consumer prices.

This trend is likely to persist however at least until the next change of guard. Interestingly, as the erstwhile progressive West starts retreating from free trade, collaborative efforts are becoming more pronounced, particularly among the Asian neighbours led by some of the fast growing BRICS countries.

This will be likely to result in altering free trade agreements between countries and blocks not only within the Asia region but with others that subscribe to free trade.

In China, the merger of commodity giants such as Chinatex and COFCO signals the intent to downsize inventories (nearly half for global corn and cotton) and huge appetite for grains such as wheat and rice that once seemed insatiable to the exporters.


Read the full article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

21/04/2017: The “Smart Chocolate Factory” – a plus for productivity and quality

It is increasingly important for chocolate producers that their plants operate at full capacity

At the Interpack trade show, Bühler is demonstrating how the use of digital services and IoT technologies offers significant gains in efficiency.


 
www.buhlergroup.com
 "With more intelligent process control, we can further improve productivity and achieve even more consistency in product quality," explains Marco Zappa, Head of Business Unit Chocolate Mass at Bühler.

The market and technology leader is also introducing its new molding plant ChocoBotic with robotic technology and its online learning platform ChocoGenius.

High productivity and consistent product quality are important factors to succeed in the industrial production of chocolate.

The increasing availability of sensors, actuators, and IoT technologies also open up opportunities for an even more efficient production in this area.

At the Interpack 2017 trade show, Bühler will be demonstrating, for instance, how the “Smart Chocolate Factory” will change the manufacturing of chocolate mass in the future.

The technology leader is showcasing more intelligent process monitoring and control for its proven DoMiReCo production line.

“Not only will it be possible to increase productivity but also to have more consistency in product quality. And because fewer manual interventions are required, the manufacturing costs drop, while food safety improves”, says Zappa, describing the most important advantages.

Bühler will also be introducing the new molding plant, ChocoBotic, at the trade show.

Thanks to the integrated robotic technology, process steps, which are usually set up sequentially, can now be arranged differently and modified flexibly to suit different masses, recipes, or products.

Both small and large chocolate processors gain an unprecedented flexibility, they can quickly respond to changing customer needs and also produce smaller batches or seasonal items.

ChocoBotic was developed by Bühler as part of an Innovation Challenge and is regarded as the pioneer of a new generation of plants for the "smart" production of chocolate items.

Digital technologies don’t stop, even when it comes to training, at the Interpack, the online learning platform ChocoGenius is celebrating its premiere. It uses interactive tutorials and learning modules to teach how to operate Bühler plants and provides valuable basic information on chocolate manufacturing.

The web-based platform is aimed primarily at operators and completes Bühler’s existing training offer.

Also in the limelight at the trade show is MyBühler, the digital platform adds another communication channel to Bühler, which, for instance, makes ordering spare parts or inquiries about prices and availability much easier and more efficient.

The Interpack is the largest and most important trade fair for processing and packaging equipment. It will be held in Düsseldorf, Germany, from May 4 to May 10, 2017, Bühler will present its complete range of process solutions in an exciting experience world, covering 1700 square meters.

In this unique environment, which includes a bistro and a Solutions Space, Bühler will display its offerings for making chocolate products, cocoa, nuts, coffee, sweets, biscuits, cookies, crackers, cereal and energy bars, breakfast cereals, and snacks.

Bühler is a global leader in processing solutions with 60 percent of all chocolate products, 40 percent of all industrially produced pasta, and 35 percent of all breakfast cereals made on the Swiss company’s technologies.

The Bühler Networking Days 2017 at Interpack will feature four core themes that strongly impact the food processing industry: sustainability, nutrition, food safety, and the growing importance of the Internet of Things.

Among the highlights of the event are some 20 innovations across the value chain, expert presentations , side events, and an exclusive networking dinner hosted by Bühler.


View the Buhler chocolate infographic, HERE.

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

21/04/2017: SITEC: Nutriad´s technical symposium Brazil

For the fourth consecutive year, multinational feed additives producer Nutriad, hosted a well-attended technical symposium in Brazil, where current trends and future challenges in animal protein production were discussed

Ten renowned industry experts, from academic and industry background, presented to an international group of poultry and swine producers at the Costão do Santinho Resort in Florianopolis, Santa Catarina.

 
www.nutriad.com
Participants varying from producers coming from integrators, feed and premixer producers as well as consultants, veterinarians, nutritionists and researchers interacted with global experts that hosted talks on the global agribusiness in general and Brazil focusing on areas as feed intake via palatability, mycotoxin management and digestive performance.

The opening day was dedicated to the applications of flavours and sweeteners in animal feed to promote nutrition at critical life stages.

Nutriad’s David Vanni Jacob, from Brazil and Simon Eskinazi from UK provided the audience with an array of technical data from across the world.

As producers sometimes have difficulties in determining the real threat that mycotoxins pose to their animals, the second day of the program was dedicated to enhance the understanding of mycotoxin management.

An interesting line up of researchers; raw material experts and industry leaders brought presentations of Dr Radka Borutova, Prof. Ana Paula Bracarense, Prof. Dr Eduardo Micotti da Glória and Guilherme Bromfman. Gut health is a key requirement for healthy and high yielding animals.

A range of topics on digestive performance were presented by Prof. Dr Elizabeth Santin, Dr Tim Goossens and Prof. Dr Roberto Guedes.

According to the event's host, Marcelo Nunes, Managing Director Nutriad South America, the 4th edition of SITEC once more exceeded expectations, "The intention is always to offer our clients and partners a program with relevant and updated guidelines on maximising the potential of their animals. At SITEC we are not only presenting technical content, we promote the interaction between attendants and speakers to forge productive relationships. Choosing Florianopolis to host our symposium - against the back drop of exuberant beaches and stunning nature - further confirms SITEC as one of the most prestigious events in the sector.”

Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

20/04/2017: Mondi wins Flexostar Award for printing excellence and customer focus

The jury of ATF Flexo (French association of flexography), consisting of experts and professionals in this sector, awarded Mondi Industrial Bags’ pinch-bottom bag solution for customer Sopral with a Flexostar Award
   
www.mondigroup.com
 The solution was produced at Mondi Lembacel SAS, France, and the plant’s product portfolio comprises pinch-bottom, open-mouth and valve bags.

For Sopral, the plant produced an attractively printed, strong pinch-bottom bag with ideal barrier properties for cat food packaging.

The excellent printing result on the laminated outer ply was honoured with the golden Flexostar Award in the category ‘print on paper’.

The winning pinch-bottom bag is constructed with four plies – with a 12-micron PET-laminated outer layer of white kraft paper 80 g/m² for outstanding print results.

Thanks to the 4-ply construction and the grease-proof outer layer, the bag is not only very strong and reliable but also ideally suited for pet food.

Sopral is a French producer of pet food and horse feed and a long-term customer of Mondi Lembacel.

Customer focus and interaction are key strategies of Mondi, and winning the Flexostar Award is once again proof of how well this strategy is adopted and lived every day.

“This is a great achievement for us to be recognised by the world of printers as one of the most reliable partners in delivering consistently high-quality print results,” said Laurent Nefoussi, Sales & Marketing Manager, Mondi Industrial Bags France.


Read more HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

April 19, 2017

20/04/2017: Gluten free rice-flour bread breakthrough could revolutionise global bread production

100 percent natural, 100 percent gluten free - get ready for the battle of the grain

Hiroshima University researchers have resolved the science behind a new bread-baking recipe. In the following press release from alphagalileo, the research findings of Hiroshima University researchers, Hiroyuki Yano, Akiko Fukui, Keiko Kajiwara, Isao Kobayashi, Koh-ichi Yoza, Akiyoshi Satake, and Masumi Villeneuve is outlined. Links to the journal article can be found below.


The method for making gluten-free bread, developed by Japan’s National Agriculture and Food Research Organization, NARO - uses rice-flour to produce bread with a similar consistency and volume to traditional wheat-flour loaves. 

 
Successful rice flour bread. Image credit: Hiroshima University
While rice-flour breads are not new, up until now their consistencies have either lacked the familiar bubble structure and volume found in wheat-flour bread – or this bubble structure has been artificially induced through additives.

This new rice bread is 100 percent natural, and importantly has a similar consistency expected by consumers used to wheat breads.

This gluten-free alternative should appeal to celiac sufferers who can’t consume gluten, and to people who wish to avoid gluten in their diets.

How it works
Wheat-flour bread’s familiar texture is down to gluten’s ability to form a flexible matrix. This matrix stabilizes the thin dough/bread walls that form between CO2 bubbles released by fermenting yeast.

It also enables bread to “rise” in response to increasing CO2 levels during the baking process. Rice flour does not contain gluten so how are these vital bread characteristics achieved in this new bread recipe? The secret lies in the processing of the rice flour used.

Not all rice flours produce a satisfactory batch, hence why this simple technique has remained undiscovered for so long! NARO found that rice flour produced by a specific type of wet milling was the key.

Using this wet-milled flour to make bread, they observed the microstructure of the fermenting batter (rice flour does not form dough), and the resulting loaf - both contained bubbles coated in uniform undamaged starch particles in a “stone wall” arrangement.

When Hiroshima University researchers investigated this ingredient, they found it possessed amazingly novel properties not seen in rice-flour before – and these were down to the undamaged starch particles that resulted from its specific milling technique.

These stable “stone walls” apparently form due to the surface activity demonstrated by undamaged starch granules.

It appears these granules are able to lower the surface tension of water and so reduce the tendency of the formed bubble walls to collapse! Other rice-flours tested, consisting of damaged starch, did not have the same water-tension lowering effect. They were thus devoid of these stable bubbles, and attempts to make bread with them fell flat.

Another factor hypothesised for undamaged starch bubble-stability in successful bread production is the uniform hydrophobicity of the similar sized granules - leading to their confinement to the interface between damp gaseous air pockets and the liquid batter.

This tightknit “stone wall” arrangement thus allows bubbles to grow and expand as CO2 levels increase within leading to successful voluminous bread.

Great Potential
Should producers see the benefits of moving to gluten-free rice flour for bread production it could conceivably shift the focus of global grain production from the prairies and steppes of the world to the paddy fields of Asia.

This would contribute to increased rice exports at a time when consumption of the staple has decreased with the adoption of western dietary habits – including ironically the eating of more bread!
From a food science point of view - this newly discovered example of a food swelling mechanism could lead to the development of new unconceived foods with unique and exciting properties. 

Read the original press release, HERE.

View the journal article, HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

Symaga company profile



Symaga Silos is a Spanish family-owned business with an international scope, specialised in designing, manufacturing and marketing of galvanised steel silos for grain storage.

With more than 30 years of experience, exceeding 6,000 installations and more than 24 million m³ of grain storage built in more than 120 countries.

Symaga is multinational family owned company able to provide technical response to the requirements of each individual project, after-sales services and able to speak in different languages as the company export rate is superior to 90 percent.

The company is dynamic, skilled, and perfect for a long-term relationship.

Now, more than ever, Symaga is your reliable storage solution.


Visit the company website HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

20/04/2017: The British engineering works of Mr William Whitmore

by Mildred Cookson, The Mills Archive, UK

This well-established British Engineering Works featured in ‘The Miller’ of November 2, 1885
 
Mildred Cookson

Continuing their series of visits to the firms principally involved in the manufacture of flour milling machinery, they reported on the ironworks at Wickham Market.

The site benefitted from its closeness to the then Great Eastern Railway, with a telegraph office close by. It was also then, among the oldest established engineering and millwrighting workshops of England.

The Wickham Market Ironworks were already more than 100 years old, having been founded in 1780 by the Grandfather of the senior partner running the firm in 1885, William Whitmore.

William, after serving an apprenticeship in mechanical engineering with a firm in Lincolnshire, was taken into partnership by his father. At that time the firm had started to manufacture steam engines and boilers and had installed them in the Chelmsford and Barking steam mill of Messrs Ridley as well as in the Isle of Thanet steam flourmills.

 
Mr WN Whitmore
In 1862, Mr John Whitmore senior retired and William succeeded him along with John Whitmore Junior. Mr George Binyon became a member of the firm around 1868, and after working in Wickham Market for ten years, took up offices at 28 Mark Lane, London.

This proved a good move as it placed the firm at the centre of the milling trade, enabling them to deal with foreign expansion of the firm, in which they supplied their stone mills, bolting chests and other machinery in which they specialised.

In January 1871, the company was approached by Mr Seth Taylor to fit up his flourmill at Waterloo Bridge, which would require 30 pairs of stones. In 1874 Mr Peter Mumford of Vauxhall flourmill made a similar request involving 24 pairs of stones.

In 1890 Mr Taylor again requested the firm to fit out St Saviour’s Mills at Dockhead with 20 pairs of stones. All these mills were also fitted out with their patent belt-driven hursts.

Many other mills would also be filled with Whitmore & Binyon machinery, for example: Messrs Marriage at Chelmsford, Messrs Press Brother’s; City Flour Mills Lincoln, Town Mills Melksham Wiltshire and Mr Jonathan Mess’s mills in Aberdeen.

On the night of December 20, 1880, a fire broke out in a shed at the back of the works. This caused £2000 (US$2491) worth of damage and the loss of several sheds and workshops.

The fire raged on for six hours, and the whole premises would have been destroyed but for an inexhaustible water supply from an artesian well on the spot.

Work continued thanks to the fact that local firms offered help and their workshops to Mr Whitmore to keep his business going.


Read the full article HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

April 18, 2017

19/04/2017: IPPE adopts integrated layout for production and processing

Hot on the heels of President’s Trumps election to the White House, IPPE 2017 opened its doors to the world of poultry, feed and meat production and processing
 
IPPE, which is an annual event sponsored by US Poultry & Egg Association, American Feed Industry Association (AFIA) and North American Meat Institute (NAMI), is one of three key exhibitions serving the intensive livestock and feed industries globally and is critically important for the continued development in regions such as Latin America.

Unlike previous years it wasn’t the weather attendees had to contend with, but a new layout of exhibitor stands following the show’s move from its traditional Halls of A and B to Halls B and C.

That masked somewhat the impact – if any – of President Trump’s Executive Order excluding visitors from certain Middle East countries from entering the USA.

Whether foreign visitor numbers were up or down on previous years or similar, there was ample antidotal comment suggesting Mexican visitors were down in number although visitors from other Latin countries were clearly evident.

There was also a feeling that Asian and Middle East attendees were fewer. However, MAG’s end-of-show interview with Nath Morris, Vice-president Expo of IPPE for the US Poultry and Egg Association, suggested it was, “too early to tell if that is the case.”

“We’ve had three good days. I felt we had full isles on the first two days although the last day is always slower. We had over 32,000 registered visitors to attend and feedback from exhibitors say they had good attendees and good leads.”

“We also know from last year that we had over 141 countries represented among attendees. I haven’t looked at those numbers yet for this year, but the total number of registrants is almost 1000 more for international visitors this year as compared to last year.”

“It’s important that we all realise that this show not only has a huge impact on the City of Atlanta, but on the USA’s business world, the GDP and economic prosperity in bringing buyers to Atlanta to look at meat, poultry and feed equipment, their suppliers and their products.”

“If we close the gate to certain countries this will certainly affect our attendee numbers and the future opportunities they provide. And it will go on to affect our exhibitors, who might think that if they can’t get to these markets they might not be in the right place in Atlanta.”

When asked how total show attendees compares with last year, Mr Morris says the numbers are up. “We are about 1800 attendees up this year on last year.”


Read the full event review HERE.
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine Milling and Grain
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com

Yenar company profile




With more than 20 years experience in the sector, Yenar have a state of the art production plant on an area of 40,000 m2, of which 18,000 m2 is covered. 

Domestic and global leaders since 1995, Yenar's equipment range includes rolls manufactured using the most up to date technology by means of the double pour centrifugal casting method. These rolls are in demand in many food sectors. 

Manufacturing 22,000 units annually of various diameters and lengths as of 2014, Yenar is the fastest growing Turkish company in the sector, supplying hundreds of food sector producers in both domestic and foreign markets by means of professional sales teams. 


Visit the website HERE
 

The Global Miller
This blog is maintained by The Global Miller staff and is supported by the magazine GFMT
which is published by Perendale Publishers Limited.


For additional daily news from milling around the world: global-milling.com